Monthly Archives: June 2016

Find The Great Spots for Your Tourism Studies

Of course, few people can spend all of their time traveling. Why not? Because earning a living has to enter the picture at some point. But following your wanderlust and having a job don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Tourism, hospitality, and leisure studies prepare students to take on vital roles in this sought-after sector while simultaneously supporting the love of travel. Not sure where to begin? Read on for six of our picks for top destinations for tourism degrees.

1. Sweden
If IKEA, ABBA and Volvo are the extent of your knowledge of Sweden, it may be time to broaden your horizons. Considered by many to be one of the planet’s most livable places, Sweden is known for its gender equality, gorgeous scenery (and inhabitants), rich history, and sustainability.

Sweden is also celebrated for its strong degree programs in tourism, including Mid Sweden University’s Master in Tourism Studies. This year-long program, drawn from leading tourism research entity the European Tourism Research Institute, offers degrees in two disciplines: tourism studies and human geography. Students learn through a number of different modes, including everything from independent research to field trips. And what better place to learn more about sustainable development than Sweden? Looking to do some travel of your own while you’re there? Mid Sweden University’s campus is situated in Östersund — close to both Swedish and Norwegian mountain ranges with easy proximity to Europe’s other leading destinations.

2. Switzerland
Switzerland has long been lauded as a premier international study destination for its unbeatable combination of quality of life and top universities. But did you know that Switzerland also has a legacy as the “birthplace of hospitality”? Home to the world’s first grand, palace-style hotels, Switzerland has played host to international luminaries drawn to everything from the country’s precision to its innovation.

More than 100 years later, Switzerland continues to set the standard in the hospitality industry, making it an unbeatable place to study tourism in programs like the Sustainability Management School’s Master in Sustainable Tourism and Protected Areas (MAM), The University of Applied Sciences HTW Chur’s MSc Business Administration in Tourism, ESOAD’s Master Européen de Management et Stratégie Touristique, and UIBS’s Master in Business Studies — Tourism and Hospitality Management.

3. The United States
More than 75 million people traveled to the U.S. in 2014, according to figures from the World Bank. And the vast majority of them need lodging, food, and other guidance along the way regarding how to best experience the country Lonely Planet describes as a “watercolor masterpiece.”

What makes the US a great place to study tourism? For starters, the breadth and depth of its offerings across hundreds of courses and programs, many of which are located in the country’s biggest tourism destinations. Factor in a commitment to innovation and top global rankings, and it’s no surprise that world’s most prestigious hospitality companies recruit grads with tourism degrees from the U.S.

4. Thailand
As tourism to Thailand continues to rise, so does the appeal of hospitality studies in this vibrant and visually stunning destination. The recent boom in English language course in Thailand means there are plenty of options for English speakers — as well as those looking to hone their English language skills — amidst Thailand’s hospitality degrees.

Have a love of tourism and a mind for business? Consider the Bangkok School of Management’s MBA in International Tourism Management to position yourself for a leadership role in this red-hot industry.

5. France
France is one of the world’s most visited countries, with Paris alone laying claim to 45 million tourists annually. Why do so many people yearn to visit the city of lights? In addition to its amazing food, breathtaking architecture, and impossibly chic people, France is also known for its unparalleled offerings when it comes to tourism and hospitality.

If you’re looking to immerse yourself in a consummate learning experience, look no further than France’s tourism degreesfocused on everything from hotel management to global tourism with applications across multiple sectors including hotels and resorts, restaurants, spas, wellness centers, theme parks, and many others.

The Reasons Of STEM Students

Once upon a time, the humanities reigned supreme in the halls of higher education. Philosophy, literature, languages, and rhetoric were seen as the pinnacles of learning and the world’s greatest minds were as comfortable with iambic pentameter as they were with the quadratic equation. But as society has shifted towards innovation and technological development, the human sciences are often neglected or disdained as soft subjects without practical application. But there’s a reason that the arts and humanities were the foundation of academia – and it’s not just because rhyme and music make memorizing the periodic table a lot easier. We’re not suggesting that students with STEM aspirations abandon the hard sciences, but here’s why a minor in a liberal arts subject could provide the balance that’s needed for future success.

1. Broaden your Career View
Science doesn’t happen in a vacuum, and even in the most sterile lab environment outside forces will have a big impact on the direction of your research and your job prospects. It may not be ideal, but the reality of the scientific world is that research funding is often dictated by politics, and scientific projects can be dependent on cultural shifts. Think about current events and the ways in which politicians leverage infectious diseases, climate science, and technological breakthroughs. And while science students often imagine careers in sterile, white laboratories, STEM subjects and the non-science world are constantly colliding. The recent Zika-virus outbreak in South America is a perfect example of the ways in which science, politics, social planning, and marketing must work together. STEM professionals need to understand not just how the natural world works, but how they can apply their knowledge and skills to real-world issues.

2. Communicate Clearly
Liberal arts won’t just help you apply your scientific expertise to problems, they will help you communicate with the non-science world. Face it, scientific and technological research can be difficult to understand if you’re not an expert. And just like Schrodinger’s famously misinterpreted cat, lay-people often misunderstand the scientific world, sometimes with disastrous consequences. Learning to write clearly, to construct a rhetorical argument, and to simplify complex ideas are essential tools for the modern STEM professional.

3. Understand the World and its Inhabitants
Neuroscience may teach you how the human brain functions and physics promises that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. But people are not just electrical impulses and their reactions aren’t always predictable. Literature, poetry, music, and art are all expressions of individual feelings and studying them can help students understand both the world and the minds of other individuals. And, ironically enough, this may be a more important skill for a scientist than acreative writing student. Scientists must understand how their work will effect both the world and individuals in order to innovate.

4. Reinforce Cultural and Ethical Responsibility
But understanding the world isn’t just about empathy and innovation. J. Robert Oppenheimer is famous for saying “Now I am become Death, destroyer of worlds” but the physicist was actually quoting from Hindu scripture. And as science and technology progress, it’s important to constantly reassess the ethical and cultural impact of the development. Doing this requires a thorough understanding of the literary, cultural, religious, and social influences that impact society. Reading Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein isn’t just an exercise in literary analysis and nineteenth century literature. The story questions the morality of scientific innovation and the responsibility of the scientist to both his creations and the world. Future scientists take note – the monster in Shelley’s horror story isn’t the creature.

Tips for a Productive Summer Break

images-31Grad students spend the academic year working hard, and the prospect of a long break during the summer can be the driving force behind finishing end-of-semester projects or submitting a new segment of your dissertation.

But as tempting as it seems, unplugging completely during the summer holidays is a luxury most grad students can’t afford. But that doesn’t mean you need to spend your summer holed up in front of you computer or buried in research. There are lots of ways to make the most of your holidays and still have a fun, relaxing time away from classes and assignments. Use these six tips to inspire your summer productivity and have the best summer yet!

1. Volunteer
Summer is the perfect time to develop areas of your resume that may be lacking due to your busy schedule during the year. Of course, part-time jobs and internships make for great work-experience, but if you want your time to be more flexible or meaningful consider volunteering. Find a program where you can utilize and develop your unique skills. Coaching a local football camp will help hone your leadership and motivational skills. Language and STEM students will find that their expertise is in high demand for volunteer reading programs. Sociology students can look for volunteer work in community organizations that address local issues. And while some volunteer programs may require some long-term commitment, many opportunities allow people to work and participate as they are able leaving you free to work and play.

2. Set Some Goals
The school year can be intense, and it can be easy to develop bad habits or fall into a hectic work schedule. But during the summer you have the chance to reboot your life. As the semester comes to a close, assess the past year and figure out what worked and what didn’t. Did you pull too many all-nighters? Are you subsisting on a diet of cereal and take-out? Are your notes in a shambles because you never took the time to develop a workable system? Identify areas that need improvement and begin practicing good habits. Even a small goal, like taking a 30-minute walk every day will improve your mood, concentration, and energy levels, and if you establish good habits in the summer, it will be easier to keep them in the fall.

3. Read Widely
If your summer reading activity consists of filling your beach bag with paperback novels and magazines, and then promptly falling asleep under an umbrella, take a moment to reassess. If you’re like most grad students, you probably spend a lot of time reading during the school year and unless you’re studying literature or theater, your reading material probably leans more toward the academic side of things. But even if you need a break from primary sources or technical manuals, don’t waste your summer not reading. Go outside your comfort area and read things that will enhance your understanding of the world.

4. Consider Summer Semester
Of course, you need a break from classes, but summer semester can be the perfect time to earn some extra credits or take a class that you wouldn’t otherwise attempt. And summer courses tend to be smaller, more personal, and more diverse than regular semester offerings. Take the opportunity to learn the basics of German or computer engineering. Explore an area of your field that is outwith your research scope. Or if you want to max out a summer semester – enroll in a short-term study abroad program. The best part of summer courses is that they’re often condensed, which means you can get a semester’s worth of studying done in just a few weeks and still have time for relaxation.